mangparl:

Ruuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuun

mangparl:

Ruuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuun

theladyintweed:

Divine

favorite artists: Claude Monet (1840-1926)

“Without the water, the lilies cannot live, as I am without art.”
“I will paint almost blind, as Beethoven composed completely deaf.”

pk-draw:

the truth is that I don’t like this drawing that much but I also spent a lot of time doing it .. so here it is, napping abemiha >_>

pk-draw:

the truth is that I don’t like this drawing that much but I also spent a lot of time doing it .. so here it is, napping abemiha >_>


Chanel Haute Counture Spring/Summer 2013.

Chanel Haute Counture Spring/Summer 2013.

aneternalscoutandabrownie:

jamesmdavisson:

So far, I have been enjoying the Adventures of Business Cat a great deal, possibly more than is appropriate for an adult human. (All of these are from the webcomic Happy Jar)

UPDATE: Now with more Business.

YES ALL THE BUSINESS CAT STRIPS IN ONE PLACE

adventuresintimeandspace:

Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

glenandrussell:

Lilting(2014) 

directed by Hong Khaou

CAST : Ben Whishaw, Pei-pei Cheng, Leila Wong, Andrew Leung

(x)

maruti-bitamin:

cloud trees

watercolour + Arches 140lb

"

In contrast, Bolingbroke is the epitome of the joy of Shakespearean opacity. When I started filming Richard II for the 2012 BBC series The Hollow Crown, I had just been performing Hamlet in 1,200-seat theatres, on the Olivier Stage at the National as well as on tour. It was an abrupt switch: from engaging so directly with audiences to doing a very different part straight in front of the camera. In the theatre, a glance to the left, for instance, is not going to read so much as a line of text, and so you use the lines as your only way of engaging with the story and with the audience.

The camera captures details, however, and it captures them so minutely that I found it difficult to gauge the amount of thought and emotion that was necessary to have bubbling up inside to ensure that there was always something behind the eyes to support the text. Both on stage and in film, there’s always an inner light, but it shines in very different ways. Bolingbroke’s light is particularly difficult to find the source of, since his lines are almost purely functional, with the two exceptions of his touching farewell to his father, John of Gaunt, and his final speech upon hearing that Richard has been murdered. Other than those two passages, there is nothing else that is emotion-based or that explains his narratives and desires. He’s one of those characters where as an actor you can’t help but notice how very little Shakespeare has given you to work with. Bolingbroke seems almost underwritten – but in a curiously good way.

"
e1n:

Pirate Docking for the #OnePieceCollab

e1n:

Pirate Docking for the #OnePieceCollab